Artúr mac Aedan of Dalriada

Among the men proposed as the historical King Arthur is a young Dalriadan prince named Artúr or Artuir. Could this prince have been the historical King Arthur?

3b7f2299758652591408e24836e39d46Birthdate: 556
Birthplace: Dalriada, Argyll, , Scotland
Death: Died 590 in Scotland
Immediate Family:
Biological son of Áedán mac Gabráin, Rí na Dál Riata and Ygerna del Acqs (Fictional)
Foster son of Domelch verch Maelgwyn
Husband of Gewenhwyfer De Bretagne
Brother of Domangart mac Áedán, Rí na Dál Riata; Eochaid Buide mac Aidan, Rí na Dál Riata; Conaing Macaedan; Bran Dál Riata; Gartnait Dál Riata and 3 others

The political situation in northern Britain was complex during Artúr’s lifetime, the last third of the sixth century A.D. Northern Britain was inhabited by four ethnic groups in close proximity: the Irish (Dalriada Scots), Picts, Britons, and Angles. Interaction between these four groups was extensive in warfare, alliance, and intermarriage.

The Irish had settled in western Scotland before recorded history but probably during the late Roman period (Nieke and Duncan 1988:6–11). The political history of the Dalriada in Britain is traced from the time of Fergus Mor (d. 501), who moved the seat of the royal dynasty of Dalriada from Ireland to northern Britain.

Scottish Dalriada was confined to the western coast of modern Scotland, including Arran, Jura, Islay, Mull, and numerous other smaller islands, with its seat at Dunadd in Argyll (Nieke and Duncan 1988:7). From 574 to 606/8, Dalriada was ruled by one of its most dynamic and successful kings, Aedan mac Gabran (Bannerman 1974:80–91), the probable father of Artúr.

The Picts held most of modern Scotland north of the region between the Firths of Clyde in the west and Forth in the east. Most of Pictish history has been lost but they are believed to have followed a unique mode of royal succession (Anderson 1980:165; Farmer 1990:46). With extensive intermarriage between all four groups, sons of foreign princes and kings often successfully claimed the Pictish throne (Anderson 1980:167–175). Dalriadan territory expanded mostly at the expense of the Picts, with whom the Scots were at a nearly constant state of war throughout the sixth and seventh centuries. During Artúr’s lifetime dominance continually fluctuated between the Picts and the Scots, and Artúr participated in these wars. More HERE

Artúr is mentioned in three medieval manuscripts. In Book I, chapter 9 of Adomnan’s8 Life of St. Columba (Anderson and Anderson 1991:32–33), written c. 700, Aedan asks Columba which of his three sons Artúr, Eochaid Find, or Domangart will succeed him. This chapter illustrated Columba’s prophetic powers, having him predict Aedan’s successor and the fates of three of his sons, including Artúr. The History of the Men of Scotland (Senchus Fer nAlban), a royal genealogy and military roster cataloging the strength of each of the three main tribal groups or cenéla of Dalriada (Bannerman 1974:154–6, 91; Anderson and Anderson 1991:160), was originally compiled in the seventh century, probably c. 650–700.9 Artúr is mentioned in the genealogical section of this document. Artúr’s death is also mentioned in the Annals of Tigernach (abbreviated AT), which date from c. 1088.

The King Arthur Conspiracy: How a Scottish Prince became a Mythical Hero by Simon Andrew Stirling – Amazon

the-king-arthur-conspiracy

 

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